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Invisible-Fluorescence-Infrared.jpg
Invisible Fluorescence (Infrared).  This is a nighttime photo of a night blooming cereus flower.  That’s nothing unusual around here (Sedona, Arizona) right now – many folks are shooting these springtime cactus blossoms at the moment.  But this one is different.<br />
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It was made with one of my infrared cameras, first of all – and the primary light source was an ultraviolet (“black light”) LED flashlight.  With an infrared filter (550nm) over the lens, the camera couldn’t directly capture the light emitted by the flashlight; it instead captured the fluorescent glow induced by that light from the innards of the flower.  Looks a bit supernatural, or maybe radioactive, eh?<br />
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So it seems I’ve herewith kicked off another series of images, embracing the ethereal infrared fluorescence of flowers (and maybe other natural subjects) illuminated by UV light.  Stay tuned - this could get interesting!<br />
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Image ©2024 James D. Peterson<br />
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Tech info: Nikon D800E camera (modified for full spectrum response, and with 550nm infrared filter on lens), Nikon 28-300mm lens at 135mm, 0.4 sec. at f/22, ISO 2000